APHASIA

February 2, 2019

APHASIA

Aphasia is a language disorder that happens when you have brain damage. Your brain has two halves. Language skills are in the left half of the brain in most people. Damage on that side of your brain may lead to language problems. Damage on the right side of your brain may cause other problems, like poor attention or memory.

Aphasia may make it hard for you to understand, speak, read, or write. It does not make you less smart or cause problems with the way you think. Brain damage can also cause other problems along with aphasia.

Aphasia is most often caused by stroke. However, any type of brain damage can cause aphasia. This includes brain tumors, traumatic brain injury, and brain disorders that get worse over time.

Aphasia can lead to a number of different problems. You may have trouble talking, understanding, reading, and writing.

Talking:

  • Can’t think of the words you want to say.
  • Say the wrong word. Sometimes, you may say something related, like “fish” instead of “chicken.” Or you might say a word that does not make much sense, like “radio” for “ball.”
  • Switch sounds in words. For example, you might say “wish dasher” for “dishwasher.”
  • Use made-up words.
  • Have a hard time saying sentences. Single words may be easier.
  • Put made-up words and real words together into sentences that do not make sense.

Understanding

  • Not understand what others say. This may happen more when they speak fast, such as on the news. You might have more trouble with longer sentences, too.
  • Find it hard to understand what others say when it is noisy or you are in a group.
  • Have trouble understanding jokes.

Reading and Writing

  • Reading forms, books, and computer screens.
  • Spelling and putting words together to write sentences.
  • Using numbers or doing math. For example, it may be hard to tell time, count money, or add and subtract.

A doctor will determine if there is a medical cause for your problem. A speech-language pathologist, or SLP, will test your speech and language skills. The SLP will ask you about the problems you have and what you want to work on. The SLP will test how well you:

  • Understand words, questions, directions, and stories.
  • Say words and sentences. The SLP will ask you to name objects, describe pictures, and answer questions.
  • Read and write. The SLP will have you write letters, words, and sentences. You will also read short stories and answer questions about them.
  • Find other ways to share your ideas when you have trouble talking. This may include pointing or using other gestures and drawing pictures.

 

 

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